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Guy Fieri Responds to Restaurant Critics

Guy Fieri Responds to Restaurant Critics


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Also, CBS claims Fieri is more Pabst Blue Ribbon than pinot noir

Sure, Guy Fieri's new Times Square restaurant has been the butt of many jokes (on SNL, online, in print), but CBS is letting Fieri talk back.

In five-minute feature about the celebrity chef, Fieri talks about his restaurant, upbringing, and the history of his food businesses. But the tough question? "Someone came to the restaurant and said they wouldn't serve the food to their cat, how did that make you feel?" Norah O'Donnell asked, referencing the Post's review from Steve Cuozzo.

"Well, he must not like the cat very much," Fieri said. "I know what I make, I know how I cook... you can't have eight restaurants and be doing it wrong. Or that wrong."

Watch the full feature below, especially as O'Donnell talks about Fieri's "hippie" upbringing with tofu dinners and his entrepreneurship at 10 years old. Sadly, she did not ask the question on everyone's mind: What does Fieri think of Anthony Bourdain?


Guy and Lori Fieri have been married for over 25 years. Here's a timeline of their relationship.

Guy Fieri and Lori Fieri (née Brisson) have been together since before the Food Network star became famous and bleached his hair.

Affectionately known as the Mayor and First Lady of Flavortown, they have been married for over 25 years and have two sons together.

Here is a timeline of Guy and Lori's long-lasting relationship:


'Times' Restaurant Critic Dishes On Guy Fieri And The Art Of Reviewing

The Big Bite Burger from Guy's American Kitchen and Bar in New York's Times Square. In 2012, New York Times restaurant critic Pete Wells penned an infamous takedown of the restaurant. Krista/Flickr hide caption

The Big Bite Burger from Guy's American Kitchen and Bar in New York's Times Square. In 2012, New York Times restaurant critic Pete Wells penned an infamous takedown of the restaurant.

Pete Wells has a job that most people can only dream of. As restaurant critic for The New York Times, he gets paid to eat out four or five nights a week — often at quite pricey places — on someone else's dime.

But for Wells, going out for drinks and delectable meals is still work. He tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies that coming up with words to describe flavors is something he "wrestles with all the time."

"I find that the dead-end route is to try to describe what's going on in your mouth," he says. "If you say, 'Oh, there was a little bit of acidity from the lime juice on the left side of my tongue, and then this beautiful, smooth pureed potato with some crunchy shallots on top, and it all came together,' you never will get out of that sentence alive."

Instead, Wells likes to describe a food's presentation in a way that gives the reader a feel for what it is like to eat: "My feeling is, if I can describe the way a steak looks on the plate, when it's just kind of juices are coming out, and it's almost alive, and just wants to be eaten, I hope that people will feel it, more than they will feel me describing the tangy minerality of the dry-aged beef between my teeth."

Interview Highlights

On beginning his very critical review of one of New York City's most expensive restaurants, Per Se, by describing the poor service as "the slow creep of mediocrity"

There is often with restaurant reviews in particular, I think, this kind of impulse to be deferential and bow down to the greatness of the restaurant and the greatness of the chef, and then with great regret to say, "And yet, all is not as it should be in the kingdom," and I didn't want to do any of that. I just think that we show an awful lot of deference to chefs in our culture and maybe not enough deference to customers, and I wanted this review to come out and say, "Yes, this is a very respected chef, but are the people at the table being respected in the same way?"

On his infamous takedown of Guy Fieri's restaurant, Guy's American Kitchen & Bar, in Times Square

I wanted to like the restaurant. I wanted the restaurant to be the same kind of celebration of grease on your elbows and grease on your ears and grease on your nose, Americans wallowing in unhealthy, unwholesome joy. . It's flashy and energetic-looking, and it seems like it's going to be this wild, crazy party. And then the food arrives and it's no party at all. At all. All of the promises of the restaurant kind of die on the plate . [like] these nachos that had this kind of gray turkey pulp on them. I don't think I've ever met nachos that I didn't like before. It's almost inconceivable that nachos can be bad. It makes no sense.

On the reaction to his brutally negative review of Fieri's restaurant

A lot of people rejoiced and thought that I was putting this interloper from television back in his place, which was not my intention. And then a lot of people thought I was being a snobby East Coast elitist who was belittling the common people and making fun of their tastes, which was not my intention at all. I wanted to say, "This can be great food, this should be great food, why isn't it great food?" But it was wild. It was really wild. I try to respond to emails that people send me after reviews come out, and that was the one time when I just absolutely could not. I couldn't keep up. There were so many and all over the place, positive and negative. After a few days, the really nasty ones started to come in, which really surprised me, because the review had been out for three or four days and then all of a sudden I started to get these really profane and vicious emails, one after another. Somebody wished that my kids would get cancer and I thought, "What have I done here?"

On his joyous review of Señor Frog, a spring-break-themed restaurant in Times Square, where he danced in a conga line wearing a 3-foot-high crown of yellow and orange balloons and drank a margarita out of a phallus-shaped glass

The reason I wanted to write about it was because — it's not the most sophisticated fun in the world, it's maybe not even my kind of fun, but it was fun. And I was really struck by how solemn so many of the restaurants I review have become. As I said in the review, it's become like going to church. Everybody used to say going to restaurants . is like theater, there's stage sets, there's drama, there's play acting and you watch the show. And now, boy, everything's just become so serious. And you sit at the counter and the chef comes out and tells you what he did to the Brussels sprouts leaves and no, there's not a lot of dancing.


Guy Fieri CRUSHED By Restaurant Critic, Slams NY Times "Agenda"

Celebrity chef Guy Fieri's new restaurant was panned SO BADLY by the New York Times this week that he felt compelled to respond on the Today show.

Guy's American Kitchen and Bar has become the butt of many jokes online this week after food critic Pete Wells' instantly quoted, searing review.

Specifically, Wells called the food "inedible," "greasy" and "ruinous" with a "chaotic" atmosphere and a staff which "seems to realize this is not a real restaurant."

Ouch. In defense of his recipes and establishment, Fieri told Today's Savannah Guthrie:

"I just thought it was ridiculous. I've read reviews. There's good and there's bad in the restaurant business. That one went overboard. [Wells] came in with an agenda."

Why his agenda would be to slam Guy unfairly, he did not say.

"I've been in the restaurant business 25 years. Do we do it perfect? No. Do we strive to do it perfect? Yes. Do I think I've fallen short? By no means," Fieri added.

"[But] do we make mistakes? Absolutely."

The Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives host, 44, conceded that people see him as a TV guy, but says he's really a chef. One person apparently does not agree.

Have you been to this or any of his restaurants? If so, tell us what you thought of it.


Guy Fieri’s Trash Can Nachos Are an Edible Masterpiece — Here’s How to Make Them

The name Guy Fieri is almost synonymous with ridiculously delicious food, so it&aposs no wonder a dish called Trash Can Nachos graces the menu at his Tequila Cocina restaurant in Boston. Order this app and you get a glorious Tex-Mex tower so high it&aposll reach the top of your head. Oh, and it&aposs absolutely delicious.

So, what do you do when travel is limited but you’re craving a plate of fully loaded tortilla chips? Recreate Guy’s stack of nacho magic at home, of course. Here’s how.

Listen to Allrecipes "Homemade" podcast to hear more about Guy Fieri&aposs cooking!

To start, make sure you have the proper equipment. You’ll need a large base (I used a plastic platter) and a nacho mold of some kind. The taller and wider, the better because hey, we’re all about aesthetics here. I used an old holiday popcorn tin after carefully removing the bottom of the metal tin with a can opener, but any trash can-esque structure will do. 

The most essential ingredient is a recipe in itself called SMC, or Super Melty Cheese. This is exactly how it sounds — a lucious, ooey-gooey cheese sauce that seeps over every chip crevice, ensuring no bite is left dry. This is the secret sauce, and you’ll never want to have another plate of nachos without it.


Guy Fieri Calls Brutal New York Times Review ‘Ridiculous’ (Video)

In a "Today" show interview, the Food Network host defends Guy's American Kitchen & Bar and accuses critic Pete Wells of having an agenda.

Erin Carlson

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Guy Fieri is speaking out about the blistering takedown in The New York Times that eviscerated his new Times Square restaurant, Guy’s American Kitchen & Bar.

“I just thought it was ridiculous. I mean, I’ve read reviews — there’s good and there’s bad in the restaurant business. But that to me went so overboard, it really seemed like there was an agenda,” the spiky-haired restaurateur and host of Food Network’s Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives said on Thursday’s edition of NBC’s Today, two days after the Times published Pete Wells‘ review, one of the most negative in the newspaper’s storied history.

Dripping with sarcasm, it includes 34 rhetorical questions beginning with: “GUY FIERI, have you eaten at your new restaurant in Times Square? Have you pulled up one of the 500 seats at Guy&rsquos American Kitchen & Bar and ordered a meal? Did you eat the food? Did it live up to your expectations?”

Wells accused Fieri, a popular chef-lebrity on Food Network who specializes in unpretentious, down-home American cuisine, as putting an “an act” in line with his man-of-the-people persona.

In a no-holds-barred blow-by-blow, he targeted Fieri’s vast menu with vicious, gleeful abandon. The Awesome Pretzel Chicken Tenders “tasted like chewy air,” Wells wrote, while the watermelon margarita “tastes like some combination of radiator fluid and formaldehyde.” The French fries were “limp and oil-sogged” (not to mention served cold), and the Cajun Chicken Alfredo contained “ghostly nubs of unblackened, unspiced white meat.”

“Do I think I’m falling short? No. By no means. I’m doing the type of food that America loves and we’re doing it right way. Could we have made mistakes? Do we make mistakes? Absolutely. Do we strive to be the best? Yes,” he told Today’s Savannah Guthrie while surrounded by a giant cheeseburger and other purportedly heart attack-inducing dishes at Guy’s American Kitchen & Bar (which, ironically, is housed in The Times‘ former headquarters on West 44th Street).

“To me it’s impossible to have a dining experience and have every single thing wrong — unless you come in with a different agenda and you want to sensationalize something and you want to blow it out of the water. It’s a great way to make a name for yourself — go after a celebrity chef that’s not a New Yorker,” he said, his voice rising with agitation.

Not surprisingly, given Fieri’s sizable Food Network fan base, much support and goodwill is coming his way to balance out the Internet Schadenfreude from those siding with notable Fieri foe Anthony Bourdain, who’s dismissed the three-floor venue as a “terror-dome.” (One THR commenter, responding to a previous report on the review, wrote: “Guy’s biggest mistake was opening a restaurant in Snobville!”)

For his part, Wells responded to the uproar in an interview on Wednesday with Times public editor Margaret Sullivan, who called his piece “a masterpiece of scorn.”

“This is important American food that makes a lot of people very happy,” said Wells, who dined at the restaurant four times before rating it “poor.” “And since that’s the case, you ought to do it right.”

When Guthrie also brought up middling reviews on Yelp, Fieri acknowledged that things stand to improve. “Without question,” he said. “I’ve been in the restaurant business 25 years. This is an ever-changing, ever-evolving process. … Do we do it perfect? No. Are we striving to do it perfect? Yes.”

Asked whether he aimed to knock peoples’ socks off, the California-based Fieri said: “At this point in time, in two months, (we’re) not really expecting to. We’re trying to. We’re trying as hard as we can to make it right, to do it right. We got a pretty big menu.”

That said, “I stand by my food. I stand by my team, and we’ll continue to do great.”


Guy Fieri: Pete Wells Had 'Another Agenda' When He Reviewed My Restaurant (VIDEO)

Flavor Town is under siege by New York Times restaurant critic Pete Wells and a hoard of supporters who loved his deliciously mean review of Guy's American Kitchen & Bar in Times Square. But this morning, Guy Fieri appeared on NBC's Today Show to defend his turf. Sort of.

In his interview with Savannah Guthrie, embedded above, Fieri offers three possible defenses for his restaurant. He says that the restaurant has only been open for two months and is still ironing out its kinks -- OK, fair. He says that his restaurant is gigantic so it's hard to ensure consistency while making all his menu items "by hand," as he proudly announces his staff does. This is less sympathetic. if Fieri knew he wouldn't be able to serve 500 people good food all at once, he probably shouldn't have designed a restaurant that seats 500 people.

Yet Fieri's most consistent argument is that Pete Wells had "another agenda" when he wrote his review. He says this no less than three times. What exactly does he mean by "agenda"?

"To me it's impossible to come in and have a dining experience and have every single thing wrong unless you come in with a different agenda and you sensationalize something and blow it out of the water," Fieri explains, possibly demonstrating that the answer to the first question in Wells's review of questions -- "Have you eaten at your new restaurant in Times Square?" -- is "no."

"It's a great way to make a name for yourself," he continues. "Go after a celebrity chef who is not a New Yorker."

Beside the fact that Wells told the Public Editor of the New York Times that his agenda was to see whether Fieri succeeded in venerating the classic American vernacular cuisine he claims to love, there's a big hole in this theory -- Wells already has a name for himself. He's the most powerful restaurant critic in the country. And before that, he was the culture editor of the New York Times. Sure, this nasty review made him a topic of discussion on Gawker and the Today Show, a rarity for any journalist, but it's hard to imagine what the upside of more name recognition for Wells would be. There's not that much room left for him to grow as a food writer. He's at the top. Would he really risk his reputation for the sake of more fame?

At the end of the segment, Guthrie -- who really goes wild with the idea that the proper Italian pronunciation of the "Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives" host's last name is "Fietti" -- asks Fieri what he would say to Wells now if he could say anything. Fieri's witty (but almost surely) canned response, in reference to the review's terminal expression of gratitude, the only sentence that was not a question? "You're welcome."


Guy Fieri on critic: 'He came in with a different agenda'

“I thought it was ridiculous, that to me was so overboard,” Fieri told TODAY’s Savannah Guthrie in his first interview since the controversy.

In a review now seen ‘round the world, critic Pete Wells tore down the celebrity chef’s new Times Square restaurant, Guy’s American Kitchen & Bar, in a series of rhetorical questions that took aim at the unsatisfactory food — as well as some seemingly personal jabs at Fieri.

“Has anyone ever told you that your high-wattage passion for no-collar American food makes you television’s answer to Calvin Trillin, if Mr. Trillin bleached his hair, drove a Camaro and drank Boozy Creamsicles? When you cruise around the country for your show “Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives,” rasping out slangy odes to the unfancy places where Americans like to get down and greasy, do you really mean it?” Wells writes. “Or is it all an act? Is that why the kind of cooking you celebrate on television is treated with so little respect at Guy’s American Kitchen & Bar?”

While Fieri admitted that the review has given him a few things to think about, he defended the quality of his establishment and his commitment to the food — asking and answering a few questions of his own.

“We’re trying as hard as we can to make it right, to do it right,” he said. “Is it perfect right now? No. Are we striving for it? Yeah.”

The bleached-blond Food Network host also took umbrage with Wells' assertions that he hadn’t stepped foot in his 500-seat restaurant, and that his cooking skills are “all an act.” Fieri told Guthrie that he was involved in every part of the restaurant, from designing the space and developing the menu to training the staff.

“This is more heart and soul,” Fieri said. “This is not just a name stamp.”

Fieri claims he was targeted by Wells, saying that he wasn’t really given a fair shake because the restaurant has only been open for two months.

“He came in with a different agenda,” Fieri said, later adding, “It's a great way to make a name for yourself, go after a celebrity chef who is not a New Yorker.”

It's not just Fieri who thought Wells’ tough critique was unwarranted a TODAY.com poll found that 59 percent of readers felt the review was "too harsh." And while Fieri is often the butt of the joke in chef circles — a notoriously tough crowd — a few of them even took his side.

Food Network host Alton Brown tweeted Tuesday: "I am planning on visiting Guy Fieri's NYC eatery this weekend because it can't be as bad as all those snooty New Yorkers say. #wishmeluck"

Others, like “Next Iron Chef” contestant Eric Greenspan, expressed their disappointment with the Times.

“I viewed this as the New York Times stepping down a level and trying to compete with blogs,” Greenspan, chef and owner of the Foundry in Los Angeles, told TODAY.com. “I look at them to rise above the Yelps of the world and give me a well-educated food review . I went to the opening of his restaurant, and look, I had a laugh about the Donkey Sauce like everyone else did. But it's Guy f------- Fieri. It's not Daniel Boulud. It's almost like they reviewed Hard Rock Cafe.”

But Wells, who visited the restaurant four times for the review, hasn’t backed down and disagrees with critics who wonder why he reviewed Guy’s restaurant in the first place.

"This is important American food that makes a lot of people very happy," Wells told the New York Times public editor. "And since that's the case, you ought to do it right."

While Fieri seemed to brush off the haterade, other chefs who’ve been torn down say the best thing you can do is grow and learn from the experience.

Fabio Viviani, a “Top Chef” veteran and cast member of “Life After Top Chef,” felt the sting after Los Angeles Times restaurant critic S. Irene Virbila ripped his restaurant Firenze Osteria.

“Sometimes a bad review can be the best thing for your career,” Viviani told TODAY.com, referring to the fact that it helps you evaluate the team you have in place to execute your vision. “If I were Guy Fieri, I'd sit down and say to my staff (and say), 'Guys, this is a restaurant, not a Food Network show.' You have to have a system in place.”

During the TODAY Professionals segment, advertising expert Donny Deutsch weighed in with his advice, telling Fieri to own his everyman image and continue to connect with customers.

"Walk right in and say, 'Yeah, we’re not for critics, we’re for you and me,'" Deutsch said.

Fieri said that "without question” the negative feedback he’s gotten will make him examine how things are done at Guy’s. “This is an ever-changing, ever-evolving process,” he said.

When asked if he had any last words for Wells, who ended his review with a sarcastic “Thank you,” Fieri laughed and said, “You’re welcome,” adding, “I stand by my food.”

And while he told TODAY that his restaurant "will move on" from the controversy, he does have a shoulder to cry on if he needs it Dr. Phil's shoulder, in fact.

"I want to do therapy on him over this," Dr. Phil joked when he joined the TODAY Professionals panel with Fieri.

As Dr. Phil also pointed out, it's been confirmed that the New York Times' own ad sales team hosted a client event at Guy's American Kitchen & Bar Wednesday night, with about 200 guests invited. A spokesperson told Poynter that the event had been planned two months prior to the kerfuffle. No word on whether the Times crew agreed with Wells that the Awesome Pretzel Chicken Tenders were "far from awesome."


Guy Fieri Shared What He's Making For The Super Bowl This Year And It's Totally Over The Top

Plus, he shared his thoughts on iconic sandwiches and the state of the restaurant industry.

As the Super Bowl quickly approaches, we're psyched about one thing, as usual: THE FOOD. Seriously, even though we won't be spending the Big Game exactly in our usual fashion (i.e.: a raging party), we're still psyched to cook up a feast fit for an NFL team. But just in case you're drawing a blank on what to make this year, we consulted the expert on all things delicious to help you out. You might know him as the Mayor of Flavortown&mdashGuy Fieri. EVER HEARD OF HIM.

Guy gave Delish the low-down on all sorts of things from what he'll be making for the Super Bowl this year to what his plans for 2021 are. First up, the food: It's no surprise that Guy has a big dish planned for the Super Bowl but this one sounds amazing, like bacon and meatballs and BBQ sauce amazing. We're talking BBQ Bacon Meatball Sliders, made with hickory-smoked bacon, his own Bourbon Brown Sugar BBQ Sauce, and served on sweet and fluffy King's Hawaiian slider buns. YUM. He loves this dish, which he created as part of his new year-long partnership with King's Hawaiian, which will include TV commercials, digital ads, and surprises at the grocery store to remind you that everything&rsquos better between King&rsquos Hawaiian bread. He keeps this recipe in his back pocket, not only because will it wow anyone you serve it to (even if it's just your family!), but also because gives you a taste of grilling even if it's not exactly warm enough to stand outside where you are right now.

"This right here with the bacon and the ground beef, the King's Hawaiian, the barbecue sauce, it gives you, especially since this isn't necessarily barbecue season all around the country. that experience without having to go out there and fire up the grill. I think this is going to be a big hit," he pined.

In fact, these sliders (shown above, BTW!) made Guy's list of his most iconic sandwiches in America. Other notable entries included the cheesesteak, pastrami, hot dog (though he even admitted he's not sure if it's actually a sandwich!), and grilled cheese. However, it's worth noting the grilled cheese that tops the list isn't just any sandwich. it's stuffed with sausage mac & cheese and served on King&rsquos Hawaiian Sliced Bread! This one was actually the brainchild of Guy and his son Hunter, who's been an integral part of the most recent season of Guy's show Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives.

If you're still thinking about what to make for the Big Game or just stuck in a cooking rut, Guy also has some tips for that. Basically, his biggest piece of advice is don't be afraid to get creative and use what you have on hand: "Step outside of your daily routine." Look at the ingredients you already have and think about what you can do with them instead of stressing about what you don't have.

Of course, cooking-related stress and burnout is still a very real thing, and that's when we turn to our favorite restaurants. Guy has obviously been a huge champion of restaurants throughout his whole career, but has especially stepped up to support them during the COVID-19 pandemic, helping to raise more than $20 million for workers in need through the Restaurant Employee Relief Fund, as well as executive producing the documentary Restaurant Hustle 2020: All On The Line, which follows restauranteurs as they deal with the effects of the pandemic. Guy told us he believes that the industry is going to change forever and that why it's still incredibly important to continue supporting your favorite spots through this year and beyond.

"Most of these folks in the restaurant business don't do it because making a fortune, they do it because they love it, they do it because they love making food for people," he said: "So we're gonna see a dynamic change in the amount of restaurants, some of your favorite restaurants are going to go away, some people aren't gonna be able to weather this storm. But what you do see is a positive side of it is that the restaurant industry sticks together, we love one another, we help each other."

Guy shared he'll be at the helm of some additional fundraising efforts to come so that you can help support the restaurant industry. As for the rest of his plans for 2021, Guy also let us in on a little secret, saying that the return of Flavortown Market, AKA the set of Guy's Grocery Games would be opening again soon. Talk about a cliffhanger!


Guy Fieri on Nasty New York Times Review: ‘I Wholeheartedly Disagree’

In a statement to THR, the embattled TV chef continues his defense of his Times Square restaurant against critic Pete Wells.

Erin Carlson

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Guy Fieri continues to defend his restaurant — and reputation — against New York Times critic Pete Wells.

Wells’ review of Guy’s American Kitchen & Bar might be the most brutal food-related takedown in the Times’ history, with the critic painting the three-story, 500-seat Times Square venue as, basically, the world’s worst place to eat.

“I normally do not respond to reviews or critics, however, given the tone of Pete&rsquos piece, it&rsquos clear to me that he went into my restaurant with his mind already made up,” Fieri says in a statement to The Hollywood Reporter. “That&rsquos unfortunate. I take comments from patrons, fans and visitors very seriously, and if there is ever a problem with our service, I&rsquoll fix it.”

In a live interview on the Today show Thursday morning that was staged inside the venue — once slammed by Fieri foe Anthony Bourdain as a “hell-dome” — Fieri called the review “ridiculous” and accused Wells of harboring an agenda.

“To me it’s impossible to have a dining experience and have every single thing wrong — unless you come in with a different agenda and you want to sensationalize something and you want to blow it out of the water. It’s a great way to make a name for yourself — go after a celebrity chef that’s not a New Yorker,” he said, his voice rising with agitation.

In his statement to THR, the affable, spiky-haired host of Food Network’s Diners, Drive-Thrus and Dives takes a more diplomatic tone.

I wholeheartedly disagree with The New York Times&rsquo Review of Guy&rsquos American Kitchen & Bar. My philosophy on life is what drives my attitude towards food. As a kid, I used to make four-course sushi meals for my parents and our family friends. I got hooked on food because I saw the way people reacted the atmosphere around a family dinner, dining out with friends and family &ndash it was contagious.

At my restaurants, we always try to live by a very simple notion: that food brings people together. I&rsquove learned that not everyone agrees with my style. The Times&rsquo critic, Pete Wells, clearly did not enjoy his experience. I normally do not respond to reviews or critics, however, given the tone of Pete&rsquos piece, it&rsquos clear to me that he went into my restaurant with his mind already made up. That&rsquos unfortunate. I take comments from patrons, fans and visitors very seriously, and if there is ever a problem with our service, I&rsquoll fix it.

We&rsquove only been open a short while, but I&rsquove seen countless people come to my restaurant &ndash families, fans, tourists, and yes, even New Yorkers &ndash looking to get away for an hour or two, and they&rsquove had a great experience and a meal that they enjoyed. Like the hundreds of diners, drive-ins and dives I&rsquove featured on my show, I&rsquove incorporated my passion and love for food into my restaurants. I&rsquom proud of the food we put out, and always will be.


Watch the video: The Truth About Diners, Drive-Ins And Dives


Comments:

  1. Hnedy

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  2. Adare

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  3. Wilfredo

    so cool to go to a good blog and read for real

  4. Jadan

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