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Click here for the Top Clean Eating Trends for 2015

Click here for the Top Clean Eating Trends for 2015


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Find out what it means to “eat clean” and what you can expect to see more of in 2015

iStock/Thinkstock

"Gluten-free baking has evolved, and the results are appealing to everyone. Baked goods made with alternative flours such as millet, almond meal, teff flour, and coconut flour are yielding baked goods that are delicious enough to eat for dessert, and healthy enough to eat for breakfast.”

Baking with Benefits

iStock/Thinkstock

"Gluten-free baking has evolved, and the results are appealing to everyone. Baked goods made with alternative flours such as millet, almond meal, teff flour, and coconut flour are yielding baked goods that are delicious enough to eat for dessert, and healthy enough to eat for breakfast.”

Sea Vegetables

iStock/Thinkstock

"When you think of food you find in the water, fish and seafood often come to mind — but there are actually vegetables growing down there, too. Sea vegetables like nori, and other types like kombu, wakame, and arame are rich in bioavailable minerals. Sea vegetables come dehydrated, so they’re super easy to store, and a little goes a long way. A thumb-size strip of kombu added to cooking grains and beans infused with minerals helps neutralize acidity, reduces gaseousness, and tenderizes food. Other sea vegetables can be used in a variety of ways, from wrapping rice and vegetables in nori for a sushi-like snack on the go to adding wakame to your soup or arame to your salad. This staple of Asian cultures is finding its way in to the American diet and our health is the benefactor."

Oats and Garlic

iStock/Thinkstock

"Two everyday foods that have extraordinary health and nutrition benefits are making their way into more diets as people seek to use ingredients they know and trust and are accessible, affordable and easy to prepare. These heart-healthy super foods never go out of style. Whether you’re making homemade granola to start your day, or adding fresh garlic to any soup, dressing, stir-fry, or casserole, you’ll be stronger and healthier as a result."

Drying/Dehydration

iStock/Thinkstock

"Dehydrated foods aren’t just for camping anymore. This is a great way to lock in nutrients and preserve a variety of foods, and all you need is an oven set to a low temperature.”

Beyond "Cleansing"

iStock/Thinkstock

"Cleanses are highly popular as a way to 'detox,' but they offer only short-term solutions. In the long term, the goal is to eat a clean food diet that supports good health and balance and features the best that each season has to offer. Getting clean may look different for each person. For some it may mean getting rid of artificial ingredients, for others it may mean getting rid of packaged foods altogether, and for someone else, it may mean going straight to the farm. What’s important is not that we make dramatic changes all at once, but that we are empowered by knowledge to make healthy choices as we go along. One new clean food or clean food recipe a week makes for a slow transition that is easier on your body, budget, digestion, and mood. Focus on bringing in new foods, not on deprivation. In the end, you’ll be cleaner on the inside and better able to support good health year-round."

Raw Foods

iStock/Thinkstock

"While some nutrients are lost in the cooking process, others are made available by cooking. A healthy mix of both provides the nutrient-rich diet we need to maintain health. Today, however, processed foods have not only taken the place of many home-cooked meals, but they’ve decreased the amount of raw foods we consume. Fresh fruits and vegetables eaten raw are cleansing and nutrient-rich, and other raw food preparations such as dehydrating, sprouting, and lacto-fermenting make nutrients even more accessible and healthy.”

Chia Seeds

iStock/Thinkstock

"These little seeds, which are showing up in everything from yogurt to water, have healthy omega-3 fats that help us maintain balance.”

Growing Your Own Food

iStock/Thinkstock

"Eating close to the source means getting to know the source, whether it’s the farm down the road or your own garden. Growing your own produce is fun, delicious, educational, and nutritious. It’s also a great way to engage children in learning about food, health, and their relationship with the environment. Working side by side in the garden is a great way to connect with family, friends, and the community — sources of nourishment that go beyond the food itself.”

Hyper-Local Eating

iStock/Thinkstock

"Each year, more and more land is being restored as farmland, supporting local sustainable food systems. Farmers markets, community supported agriculture, food hubs, and community farms are making food accessible to everyone while nourishing the land and communities in the process."

Label-Free Choices

iStock/Thinkstock

"People are continuing to move away from packaged and canned foods and going for fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and legumes, and nuts and seeds, which tend to be higher in nutritional value. Foods with labels [prepackaged] often include ingredients that sound like a formula, and if you can’t identify them in your mind, chances are that you won’t be able to digest them well in your body either. By putting the package back and searching for another option, you’ll be one step closer eating clean and living well, one healthy choice at a time."

What is "Eating Clean?"

iStock/Thinkstock

“There’s no doubt in my mind that the more convoluted our food [supply] chain has become, the more people desire to return to the basics. People want to know what they’re eating and where it comes from in order to be empowered to make the choices that are right for themselves and their families. That’s what eating clean is all about.”

If you’re considering making clean eating a 2015 resolution, Walters shared some tips and trends to expect in the upcoming year for an easy clean eating transition.


Your Guide to Eating Clean

We’ve all had it drummed into our heads for as long as we can remember: Processed foods are bad for you and whole, natural ones are good.

Yet for some reason, “clean eating”—it’s really as simple as that—has recently become a trend. Frankly, calling it a “trend,” a word that implies temporary interest, is probably doing more harm than good, because if there’s one eating philosophy you’ll want to stick with for the rest of your life, clean eating is it. And the benefits extend far beyond mere weight loss.

Nonetheless, we’ll consider it a good thing that clean eating is finally getting the attention it deserves. So with the help of some new encouraging research, let’s review how eating clean can help you become a leaner, stronger, and even happier person in 2015 and beyond.

As with most nutrition trends, a key reason clean eating is gaining steam right now is because of its potential to help you lose weight. Fortunately, research supports this. A study from the Harvard School of Public Health reported that subjects who increased their consumption of whole grains and whole fruits and vegetables over a 20-year span gained significantly less weight than a control group.

And even though clean eating puts no restrictions on how much you eat—and doesn’t enforce quotas for macronutrients like protein, carbs, and fat—anecdotal evidence consistently sees clean eaters taking in fewer calories.

“I’ve had male clients struggle to hit the 2,000-calorie mark when they’ve cut out all refined foods and eaten only real foods,” says Nate Miyaki, C.S.S.N., a nutrition consultant and author of Feast Your Fat Away.

But that’s just one example of what clean eating can do for you. More than merely helping you lose weight, cleaning up your diet can help you put on muscle more efficiently, boost your immune system, improve your health, and add to your happiness.

“Eating clean means eating natural foods—foods that don’t have added sugars, chemicals, or unhealthy fats,” says Douglas S. Kalman, Ph.D., R.D., director of clinical nutrition at Miami Research Associates. Processed foods, on the other hand, are very regularly stripped of valuable nutrients as they’re manufactured into convenience foods.

“That complex of nutrients [in the original whole food] actually affords maximal digestibility and usability, metabolically in the body,” says Jonathan Wright, M.D., nutrition expert and co-author of Eating Clean for Dummies. Grains, for example, typically go through an intensive procedure to make them into bread or pasta—the milling removes layers that contain the majority of their beneficial fiber, antioxidants, minerals, and vitamins.

Similarly, the heat involved in canning foods can destroy vitamins, and chemicals are often added to “low-fat” products to compensate for the loss of flavor and texture.

“‘Fake’ foods like this are just empty calories with no functional nutrients,” Miyaki says. “They have no effect on satiety or on the hormones that regulate appetite and energy intake. They leave you feeling hungry, deprived, and miserable.”


Your Guide to Eating Clean

We’ve all had it drummed into our heads for as long as we can remember: Processed foods are bad for you and whole, natural ones are good.

Yet for some reason, “clean eating”—it’s really as simple as that—has recently become a trend. Frankly, calling it a “trend,” a word that implies temporary interest, is probably doing more harm than good, because if there’s one eating philosophy you’ll want to stick with for the rest of your life, clean eating is it. And the benefits extend far beyond mere weight loss.

Nonetheless, we’ll consider it a good thing that clean eating is finally getting the attention it deserves. So with the help of some new encouraging research, let’s review how eating clean can help you become a leaner, stronger, and even happier person in 2015 and beyond.

As with most nutrition trends, a key reason clean eating is gaining steam right now is because of its potential to help you lose weight. Fortunately, research supports this. A study from the Harvard School of Public Health reported that subjects who increased their consumption of whole grains and whole fruits and vegetables over a 20-year span gained significantly less weight than a control group.

And even though clean eating puts no restrictions on how much you eat—and doesn’t enforce quotas for macronutrients like protein, carbs, and fat—anecdotal evidence consistently sees clean eaters taking in fewer calories.

“I’ve had male clients struggle to hit the 2,000-calorie mark when they’ve cut out all refined foods and eaten only real foods,” says Nate Miyaki, C.S.S.N., a nutrition consultant and author of Feast Your Fat Away.

But that’s just one example of what clean eating can do for you. More than merely helping you lose weight, cleaning up your diet can help you put on muscle more efficiently, boost your immune system, improve your health, and add to your happiness.

“Eating clean means eating natural foods—foods that don’t have added sugars, chemicals, or unhealthy fats,” says Douglas S. Kalman, Ph.D., R.D., director of clinical nutrition at Miami Research Associates. Processed foods, on the other hand, are very regularly stripped of valuable nutrients as they’re manufactured into convenience foods.

“That complex of nutrients [in the original whole food] actually affords maximal digestibility and usability, metabolically in the body,” says Jonathan Wright, M.D., nutrition expert and co-author of Eating Clean for Dummies. Grains, for example, typically go through an intensive procedure to make them into bread or pasta—the milling removes layers that contain the majority of their beneficial fiber, antioxidants, minerals, and vitamins.

Similarly, the heat involved in canning foods can destroy vitamins, and chemicals are often added to “low-fat” products to compensate for the loss of flavor and texture.

“‘Fake’ foods like this are just empty calories with no functional nutrients,” Miyaki says. “They have no effect on satiety or on the hormones that regulate appetite and energy intake. They leave you feeling hungry, deprived, and miserable.”


Your Guide to Eating Clean

We’ve all had it drummed into our heads for as long as we can remember: Processed foods are bad for you and whole, natural ones are good.

Yet for some reason, “clean eating”—it’s really as simple as that—has recently become a trend. Frankly, calling it a “trend,” a word that implies temporary interest, is probably doing more harm than good, because if there’s one eating philosophy you’ll want to stick with for the rest of your life, clean eating is it. And the benefits extend far beyond mere weight loss.

Nonetheless, we’ll consider it a good thing that clean eating is finally getting the attention it deserves. So with the help of some new encouraging research, let’s review how eating clean can help you become a leaner, stronger, and even happier person in 2015 and beyond.

As with most nutrition trends, a key reason clean eating is gaining steam right now is because of its potential to help you lose weight. Fortunately, research supports this. A study from the Harvard School of Public Health reported that subjects who increased their consumption of whole grains and whole fruits and vegetables over a 20-year span gained significantly less weight than a control group.

And even though clean eating puts no restrictions on how much you eat—and doesn’t enforce quotas for macronutrients like protein, carbs, and fat—anecdotal evidence consistently sees clean eaters taking in fewer calories.

“I’ve had male clients struggle to hit the 2,000-calorie mark when they’ve cut out all refined foods and eaten only real foods,” says Nate Miyaki, C.S.S.N., a nutrition consultant and author of Feast Your Fat Away.

But that’s just one example of what clean eating can do for you. More than merely helping you lose weight, cleaning up your diet can help you put on muscle more efficiently, boost your immune system, improve your health, and add to your happiness.

“Eating clean means eating natural foods—foods that don’t have added sugars, chemicals, or unhealthy fats,” says Douglas S. Kalman, Ph.D., R.D., director of clinical nutrition at Miami Research Associates. Processed foods, on the other hand, are very regularly stripped of valuable nutrients as they’re manufactured into convenience foods.

“That complex of nutrients [in the original whole food] actually affords maximal digestibility and usability, metabolically in the body,” says Jonathan Wright, M.D., nutrition expert and co-author of Eating Clean for Dummies. Grains, for example, typically go through an intensive procedure to make them into bread or pasta—the milling removes layers that contain the majority of their beneficial fiber, antioxidants, minerals, and vitamins.

Similarly, the heat involved in canning foods can destroy vitamins, and chemicals are often added to “low-fat” products to compensate for the loss of flavor and texture.

“‘Fake’ foods like this are just empty calories with no functional nutrients,” Miyaki says. “They have no effect on satiety or on the hormones that regulate appetite and energy intake. They leave you feeling hungry, deprived, and miserable.”


Your Guide to Eating Clean

We’ve all had it drummed into our heads for as long as we can remember: Processed foods are bad for you and whole, natural ones are good.

Yet for some reason, “clean eating”—it’s really as simple as that—has recently become a trend. Frankly, calling it a “trend,” a word that implies temporary interest, is probably doing more harm than good, because if there’s one eating philosophy you’ll want to stick with for the rest of your life, clean eating is it. And the benefits extend far beyond mere weight loss.

Nonetheless, we’ll consider it a good thing that clean eating is finally getting the attention it deserves. So with the help of some new encouraging research, let’s review how eating clean can help you become a leaner, stronger, and even happier person in 2015 and beyond.

As with most nutrition trends, a key reason clean eating is gaining steam right now is because of its potential to help you lose weight. Fortunately, research supports this. A study from the Harvard School of Public Health reported that subjects who increased their consumption of whole grains and whole fruits and vegetables over a 20-year span gained significantly less weight than a control group.

And even though clean eating puts no restrictions on how much you eat—and doesn’t enforce quotas for macronutrients like protein, carbs, and fat—anecdotal evidence consistently sees clean eaters taking in fewer calories.

“I’ve had male clients struggle to hit the 2,000-calorie mark when they’ve cut out all refined foods and eaten only real foods,” says Nate Miyaki, C.S.S.N., a nutrition consultant and author of Feast Your Fat Away.

But that’s just one example of what clean eating can do for you. More than merely helping you lose weight, cleaning up your diet can help you put on muscle more efficiently, boost your immune system, improve your health, and add to your happiness.

“Eating clean means eating natural foods—foods that don’t have added sugars, chemicals, or unhealthy fats,” says Douglas S. Kalman, Ph.D., R.D., director of clinical nutrition at Miami Research Associates. Processed foods, on the other hand, are very regularly stripped of valuable nutrients as they’re manufactured into convenience foods.

“That complex of nutrients [in the original whole food] actually affords maximal digestibility and usability, metabolically in the body,” says Jonathan Wright, M.D., nutrition expert and co-author of Eating Clean for Dummies. Grains, for example, typically go through an intensive procedure to make them into bread or pasta—the milling removes layers that contain the majority of their beneficial fiber, antioxidants, minerals, and vitamins.

Similarly, the heat involved in canning foods can destroy vitamins, and chemicals are often added to “low-fat” products to compensate for the loss of flavor and texture.

“‘Fake’ foods like this are just empty calories with no functional nutrients,” Miyaki says. “They have no effect on satiety or on the hormones that regulate appetite and energy intake. They leave you feeling hungry, deprived, and miserable.”


Your Guide to Eating Clean

We’ve all had it drummed into our heads for as long as we can remember: Processed foods are bad for you and whole, natural ones are good.

Yet for some reason, “clean eating”—it’s really as simple as that—has recently become a trend. Frankly, calling it a “trend,” a word that implies temporary interest, is probably doing more harm than good, because if there’s one eating philosophy you’ll want to stick with for the rest of your life, clean eating is it. And the benefits extend far beyond mere weight loss.

Nonetheless, we’ll consider it a good thing that clean eating is finally getting the attention it deserves. So with the help of some new encouraging research, let’s review how eating clean can help you become a leaner, stronger, and even happier person in 2015 and beyond.

As with most nutrition trends, a key reason clean eating is gaining steam right now is because of its potential to help you lose weight. Fortunately, research supports this. A study from the Harvard School of Public Health reported that subjects who increased their consumption of whole grains and whole fruits and vegetables over a 20-year span gained significantly less weight than a control group.

And even though clean eating puts no restrictions on how much you eat—and doesn’t enforce quotas for macronutrients like protein, carbs, and fat—anecdotal evidence consistently sees clean eaters taking in fewer calories.

“I’ve had male clients struggle to hit the 2,000-calorie mark when they’ve cut out all refined foods and eaten only real foods,” says Nate Miyaki, C.S.S.N., a nutrition consultant and author of Feast Your Fat Away.

But that’s just one example of what clean eating can do for you. More than merely helping you lose weight, cleaning up your diet can help you put on muscle more efficiently, boost your immune system, improve your health, and add to your happiness.

“Eating clean means eating natural foods—foods that don’t have added sugars, chemicals, or unhealthy fats,” says Douglas S. Kalman, Ph.D., R.D., director of clinical nutrition at Miami Research Associates. Processed foods, on the other hand, are very regularly stripped of valuable nutrients as they’re manufactured into convenience foods.

“That complex of nutrients [in the original whole food] actually affords maximal digestibility and usability, metabolically in the body,” says Jonathan Wright, M.D., nutrition expert and co-author of Eating Clean for Dummies. Grains, for example, typically go through an intensive procedure to make them into bread or pasta—the milling removes layers that contain the majority of their beneficial fiber, antioxidants, minerals, and vitamins.

Similarly, the heat involved in canning foods can destroy vitamins, and chemicals are often added to “low-fat” products to compensate for the loss of flavor and texture.

“‘Fake’ foods like this are just empty calories with no functional nutrients,” Miyaki says. “They have no effect on satiety or on the hormones that regulate appetite and energy intake. They leave you feeling hungry, deprived, and miserable.”


Your Guide to Eating Clean

We’ve all had it drummed into our heads for as long as we can remember: Processed foods are bad for you and whole, natural ones are good.

Yet for some reason, “clean eating”—it’s really as simple as that—has recently become a trend. Frankly, calling it a “trend,” a word that implies temporary interest, is probably doing more harm than good, because if there’s one eating philosophy you’ll want to stick with for the rest of your life, clean eating is it. And the benefits extend far beyond mere weight loss.

Nonetheless, we’ll consider it a good thing that clean eating is finally getting the attention it deserves. So with the help of some new encouraging research, let’s review how eating clean can help you become a leaner, stronger, and even happier person in 2015 and beyond.

As with most nutrition trends, a key reason clean eating is gaining steam right now is because of its potential to help you lose weight. Fortunately, research supports this. A study from the Harvard School of Public Health reported that subjects who increased their consumption of whole grains and whole fruits and vegetables over a 20-year span gained significantly less weight than a control group.

And even though clean eating puts no restrictions on how much you eat—and doesn’t enforce quotas for macronutrients like protein, carbs, and fat—anecdotal evidence consistently sees clean eaters taking in fewer calories.

“I’ve had male clients struggle to hit the 2,000-calorie mark when they’ve cut out all refined foods and eaten only real foods,” says Nate Miyaki, C.S.S.N., a nutrition consultant and author of Feast Your Fat Away.

But that’s just one example of what clean eating can do for you. More than merely helping you lose weight, cleaning up your diet can help you put on muscle more efficiently, boost your immune system, improve your health, and add to your happiness.

“Eating clean means eating natural foods—foods that don’t have added sugars, chemicals, or unhealthy fats,” says Douglas S. Kalman, Ph.D., R.D., director of clinical nutrition at Miami Research Associates. Processed foods, on the other hand, are very regularly stripped of valuable nutrients as they’re manufactured into convenience foods.

“That complex of nutrients [in the original whole food] actually affords maximal digestibility and usability, metabolically in the body,” says Jonathan Wright, M.D., nutrition expert and co-author of Eating Clean for Dummies. Grains, for example, typically go through an intensive procedure to make them into bread or pasta—the milling removes layers that contain the majority of their beneficial fiber, antioxidants, minerals, and vitamins.

Similarly, the heat involved in canning foods can destroy vitamins, and chemicals are often added to “low-fat” products to compensate for the loss of flavor and texture.

“‘Fake’ foods like this are just empty calories with no functional nutrients,” Miyaki says. “They have no effect on satiety or on the hormones that regulate appetite and energy intake. They leave you feeling hungry, deprived, and miserable.”


Your Guide to Eating Clean

We’ve all had it drummed into our heads for as long as we can remember: Processed foods are bad for you and whole, natural ones are good.

Yet for some reason, “clean eating”—it’s really as simple as that—has recently become a trend. Frankly, calling it a “trend,” a word that implies temporary interest, is probably doing more harm than good, because if there’s one eating philosophy you’ll want to stick with for the rest of your life, clean eating is it. And the benefits extend far beyond mere weight loss.

Nonetheless, we’ll consider it a good thing that clean eating is finally getting the attention it deserves. So with the help of some new encouraging research, let’s review how eating clean can help you become a leaner, stronger, and even happier person in 2015 and beyond.

As with most nutrition trends, a key reason clean eating is gaining steam right now is because of its potential to help you lose weight. Fortunately, research supports this. A study from the Harvard School of Public Health reported that subjects who increased their consumption of whole grains and whole fruits and vegetables over a 20-year span gained significantly less weight than a control group.

And even though clean eating puts no restrictions on how much you eat—and doesn’t enforce quotas for macronutrients like protein, carbs, and fat—anecdotal evidence consistently sees clean eaters taking in fewer calories.

“I’ve had male clients struggle to hit the 2,000-calorie mark when they’ve cut out all refined foods and eaten only real foods,” says Nate Miyaki, C.S.S.N., a nutrition consultant and author of Feast Your Fat Away.

But that’s just one example of what clean eating can do for you. More than merely helping you lose weight, cleaning up your diet can help you put on muscle more efficiently, boost your immune system, improve your health, and add to your happiness.

“Eating clean means eating natural foods—foods that don’t have added sugars, chemicals, or unhealthy fats,” says Douglas S. Kalman, Ph.D., R.D., director of clinical nutrition at Miami Research Associates. Processed foods, on the other hand, are very regularly stripped of valuable nutrients as they’re manufactured into convenience foods.

“That complex of nutrients [in the original whole food] actually affords maximal digestibility and usability, metabolically in the body,” says Jonathan Wright, M.D., nutrition expert and co-author of Eating Clean for Dummies. Grains, for example, typically go through an intensive procedure to make them into bread or pasta—the milling removes layers that contain the majority of their beneficial fiber, antioxidants, minerals, and vitamins.

Similarly, the heat involved in canning foods can destroy vitamins, and chemicals are often added to “low-fat” products to compensate for the loss of flavor and texture.

“‘Fake’ foods like this are just empty calories with no functional nutrients,” Miyaki says. “They have no effect on satiety or on the hormones that regulate appetite and energy intake. They leave you feeling hungry, deprived, and miserable.”


Your Guide to Eating Clean

We’ve all had it drummed into our heads for as long as we can remember: Processed foods are bad for you and whole, natural ones are good.

Yet for some reason, “clean eating”—it’s really as simple as that—has recently become a trend. Frankly, calling it a “trend,” a word that implies temporary interest, is probably doing more harm than good, because if there’s one eating philosophy you’ll want to stick with for the rest of your life, clean eating is it. And the benefits extend far beyond mere weight loss.

Nonetheless, we’ll consider it a good thing that clean eating is finally getting the attention it deserves. So with the help of some new encouraging research, let’s review how eating clean can help you become a leaner, stronger, and even happier person in 2015 and beyond.

As with most nutrition trends, a key reason clean eating is gaining steam right now is because of its potential to help you lose weight. Fortunately, research supports this. A study from the Harvard School of Public Health reported that subjects who increased their consumption of whole grains and whole fruits and vegetables over a 20-year span gained significantly less weight than a control group.

And even though clean eating puts no restrictions on how much you eat—and doesn’t enforce quotas for macronutrients like protein, carbs, and fat—anecdotal evidence consistently sees clean eaters taking in fewer calories.

“I’ve had male clients struggle to hit the 2,000-calorie mark when they’ve cut out all refined foods and eaten only real foods,” says Nate Miyaki, C.S.S.N., a nutrition consultant and author of Feast Your Fat Away.

But that’s just one example of what clean eating can do for you. More than merely helping you lose weight, cleaning up your diet can help you put on muscle more efficiently, boost your immune system, improve your health, and add to your happiness.

“Eating clean means eating natural foods—foods that don’t have added sugars, chemicals, or unhealthy fats,” says Douglas S. Kalman, Ph.D., R.D., director of clinical nutrition at Miami Research Associates. Processed foods, on the other hand, are very regularly stripped of valuable nutrients as they’re manufactured into convenience foods.

“That complex of nutrients [in the original whole food] actually affords maximal digestibility and usability, metabolically in the body,” says Jonathan Wright, M.D., nutrition expert and co-author of Eating Clean for Dummies. Grains, for example, typically go through an intensive procedure to make them into bread or pasta—the milling removes layers that contain the majority of their beneficial fiber, antioxidants, minerals, and vitamins.

Similarly, the heat involved in canning foods can destroy vitamins, and chemicals are often added to “low-fat” products to compensate for the loss of flavor and texture.

“‘Fake’ foods like this are just empty calories with no functional nutrients,” Miyaki says. “They have no effect on satiety or on the hormones that regulate appetite and energy intake. They leave you feeling hungry, deprived, and miserable.”


Your Guide to Eating Clean

We’ve all had it drummed into our heads for as long as we can remember: Processed foods are bad for you and whole, natural ones are good.

Yet for some reason, “clean eating”—it’s really as simple as that—has recently become a trend. Frankly, calling it a “trend,” a word that implies temporary interest, is probably doing more harm than good, because if there’s one eating philosophy you’ll want to stick with for the rest of your life, clean eating is it. And the benefits extend far beyond mere weight loss.

Nonetheless, we’ll consider it a good thing that clean eating is finally getting the attention it deserves. So with the help of some new encouraging research, let’s review how eating clean can help you become a leaner, stronger, and even happier person in 2015 and beyond.

As with most nutrition trends, a key reason clean eating is gaining steam right now is because of its potential to help you lose weight. Fortunately, research supports this. A study from the Harvard School of Public Health reported that subjects who increased their consumption of whole grains and whole fruits and vegetables over a 20-year span gained significantly less weight than a control group.

And even though clean eating puts no restrictions on how much you eat—and doesn’t enforce quotas for macronutrients like protein, carbs, and fat—anecdotal evidence consistently sees clean eaters taking in fewer calories.

“I’ve had male clients struggle to hit the 2,000-calorie mark when they’ve cut out all refined foods and eaten only real foods,” says Nate Miyaki, C.S.S.N., a nutrition consultant and author of Feast Your Fat Away.

But that’s just one example of what clean eating can do for you. More than merely helping you lose weight, cleaning up your diet can help you put on muscle more efficiently, boost your immune system, improve your health, and add to your happiness.

“Eating clean means eating natural foods—foods that don’t have added sugars, chemicals, or unhealthy fats,” says Douglas S. Kalman, Ph.D., R.D., director of clinical nutrition at Miami Research Associates. Processed foods, on the other hand, are very regularly stripped of valuable nutrients as they’re manufactured into convenience foods.

“That complex of nutrients [in the original whole food] actually affords maximal digestibility and usability, metabolically in the body,” says Jonathan Wright, M.D., nutrition expert and co-author of Eating Clean for Dummies. Grains, for example, typically go through an intensive procedure to make them into bread or pasta—the milling removes layers that contain the majority of their beneficial fiber, antioxidants, minerals, and vitamins.

Similarly, the heat involved in canning foods can destroy vitamins, and chemicals are often added to “low-fat” products to compensate for the loss of flavor and texture.

“‘Fake’ foods like this are just empty calories with no functional nutrients,” Miyaki says. “They have no effect on satiety or on the hormones that regulate appetite and energy intake. They leave you feeling hungry, deprived, and miserable.”


Your Guide to Eating Clean

We’ve all had it drummed into our heads for as long as we can remember: Processed foods are bad for you and whole, natural ones are good.

Yet for some reason, “clean eating”—it’s really as simple as that—has recently become a trend. Frankly, calling it a “trend,” a word that implies temporary interest, is probably doing more harm than good, because if there’s one eating philosophy you’ll want to stick with for the rest of your life, clean eating is it. And the benefits extend far beyond mere weight loss.

Nonetheless, we’ll consider it a good thing that clean eating is finally getting the attention it deserves. So with the help of some new encouraging research, let’s review how eating clean can help you become a leaner, stronger, and even happier person in 2015 and beyond.

As with most nutrition trends, a key reason clean eating is gaining steam right now is because of its potential to help you lose weight. Fortunately, research supports this. A study from the Harvard School of Public Health reported that subjects who increased their consumption of whole grains and whole fruits and vegetables over a 20-year span gained significantly less weight than a control group.

And even though clean eating puts no restrictions on how much you eat—and doesn’t enforce quotas for macronutrients like protein, carbs, and fat—anecdotal evidence consistently sees clean eaters taking in fewer calories.

“I’ve had male clients struggle to hit the 2,000-calorie mark when they’ve cut out all refined foods and eaten only real foods,” says Nate Miyaki, C.S.S.N., a nutrition consultant and author of Feast Your Fat Away.

But that’s just one example of what clean eating can do for you. More than merely helping you lose weight, cleaning up your diet can help you put on muscle more efficiently, boost your immune system, improve your health, and add to your happiness.

“Eating clean means eating natural foods—foods that don’t have added sugars, chemicals, or unhealthy fats,” says Douglas S. Kalman, Ph.D., R.D., director of clinical nutrition at Miami Research Associates. Processed foods, on the other hand, are very regularly stripped of valuable nutrients as they’re manufactured into convenience foods.

“That complex of nutrients [in the original whole food] actually affords maximal digestibility and usability, metabolically in the body,” says Jonathan Wright, M.D., nutrition expert and co-author of Eating Clean for Dummies. Grains, for example, typically go through an intensive procedure to make them into bread or pasta—the milling removes layers that contain the majority of their beneficial fiber, antioxidants, minerals, and vitamins.

Similarly, the heat involved in canning foods can destroy vitamins, and chemicals are often added to “low-fat” products to compensate for the loss of flavor and texture.

“‘Fake’ foods like this are just empty calories with no functional nutrients,” Miyaki says. “They have no effect on satiety or on the hormones that regulate appetite and energy intake. They leave you feeling hungry, deprived, and miserable.”


Watch the video: ΚΛΙΚ ΣΤΗΝ ΔΙΑΤΡΟΦΗ ΚΑΙ ΥΓΕΙΑ - SMOOTHIES - ΠΑΝΟΣ ΠΛΑΤΡΙΤΗΣ


Comments:

  1. Aethelisdun

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  2. Kazinris

    Strongly disagree

  3. Dodinel

    There is a website with a huge amount of information on a topic of interest to you.



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